Pasta & Noodle Recipes

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Lasagna with Mushroom Ragù and Prosciutto Cotto
This 24-layered pasta masterpiece from Danielle Glantz, chef and owner of Pastaio Via Corta, a pasta shop in Gloucester, Massachusetts, consists of a hearty mushroom ragù made with both dried and fresh mushrooms; a creamy, onion-infused béchamel; and salty slices of prosciutto cotto, layered between handmade sheets of pasta. "The pasta sheets are like silk—it's something special to share with the people you care about most," says Glantz, who likes to spread this project recipe out rather than making everything at once. "I suggest spacing out the recipe over a couple days. Make the ragù, then make the béchamel, and the morning of, make the pasta." When rolling out the pasta, be sure to use flour very sparingly. If you use too much it can dry the dough out very quickly, and the dough will become very hard to work with. Be sure to let the lasagna rest for 30 minutes before cutting into it. The ragù and the béchamel can be made up to 3 days ahead, and the pasta can be made 1 day ahead.
Sfoglia
Handmade pasta is a thing of beauty, and Danielle Glantz's gigantic sheets of egg pasta are a work of art. Glantz prefers making and rolling her dough on a floured wooden work surface for the perfect amount of friction and give. Her recipe involves a good bit of elbow grease, but one taste of this silky, hand-rolled pasta justifies the time spent making it. When rolling the pasta, use flour very sparingly to keep the dough moist and tender.
Onion Béchamel
Instead of rushing through the béchamel for her epic lasagna, chef Danielle Glantz of Pastaio Via Corta opts for a long, slow simmer, allowing the rich, thick white sauce to become infused with the flavor of a halved onion that becomes meltingly tender as the sauce cooks and thickens. This rich sauce can be made a day ahead and refrigerated in airtight container; reheat slowly over low heat, adding a splash of water to loosen, if needed.
27 Noodle Recipes to Put on Repeat
Cold noodles. Warm noodles. Noodle soup. Whatever your noodle jam is, this collection of recipes includes all kinds of tasty dishes, ranging from homemade Biang Biang Noodles courtesy of Jing Gao, to Squid and Shrimp Fideuà with Allioli. You'll also find Parsley Egg Noodles with Squash-and-Tomato Sugo, Pancit, and even Life-Changing Udon with Soft-Boiled Egg, Hot Soy, and Black Pepper (read Hetty McKinnon's essay to find out why they're life-changing). Read on for even more noodle recipes we love.
You Don't Get to Just Show Up with Mac 'n' Cheese at My House
You have to be assigned. You have to be appointed. You have to be anointed.
Southern-Style Mac 'n' Cheese
Rating: Unrated 6
Three different kinds of cheese—extra-sharp cheddar, Colby-Jack, and cream cheese—go into this creamy, savory macaroni and cheese recipe, which also gets layers of flavor from fresh bay leaves and dry mustard. Southern-style mac 'n' cheese is typically made with a milk-and-egg base rather than a roux. Here, the milk component is an infused milk-and-cream mixture reserved from cooking the noodles (which adds even more richness to the dish). Make this one of the starring sides at your Thanksgiving table.
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Baked Shells with Gremolata Breadcrumbs
Rating: Unrated 1
Macaroni and cheese is always a crowd-pleaser. This version features a combination of fontina for optimal gooey texture and cheddar for its tangy flavor, and a crispy mix of toasted panko, parsley, lemon, and garlic that cuts through the richness of the ultra-creamy baked shells.
Squid and Shrimp Fideuà with Allioli
In this one-skillet main course inspired by Camins 2 Dreams, winemaker Mireia Taribó's homeland of Catalonia in northeastern Spain, slowly sautéed squid and shrimp nestle into a bed of short, thin noodles. The fideuà noodles soak up the seafood stock and onions as they cook, their flavor intensifying as they crisp on the bottom of the pan. Be careful not to overcook the seafood—especially the squid—during the initial sauté.

Chilled Sesame Noodles

There's good reason to believe that cold sesame noodles were first brought to New York 40 years ago by chef Shorty Tang at Hwa Yuan in Chinatown. Since then, chilled sesame noodles have been a ubiquitous part of Chinese takeout. At Junzi, sesame noodles have been one of our signature dishes since we opened, thanks to a deeply flavorful, carefully layered sesame sauce made of pure sesame paste, aromatics, and fermented tofu. Finish off the dish with chile oil and it's a classic-but not like one you've had before.